Cabecera ciencia en ingles

Viernes, 25 de Enero de 2013

Female Thin Bodies Like Men More than Women


  • Researchers at the University of Granada examined immediate emotions –in subjective and psychophysiological terms– after being shown different male and female bodies.
  • When women with bulimia nervosa see their own body they react as if it was a phobic stimulus. Thus, when these women see themselves in a picture or video they experience motor paralysis as a psychophysiological response.

A study conducted at the University of Granada has demonstrated that men like female thinness more than women and they find female overweight more unpleasant than women. In addition, the study revealed that women who are not comfortable with their body perceive women with a “normal” body –i.e. women with a healthy weight– as a threat. Specifically, when these women see a “normal” body they experience feelings of displeasure and lack of control, since they feel they have not any control on their own body and cannot make it be as they want.

This research study was conducted by researchers at the Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment of the University of Granada. The authors found that women who are not comfortable with their body feel embarrassed and uneasy when they see themselves in a picture or video, especially if they are imitating the poses of a professional model.

A Study in 671 University Students

To carry out this study, the researchers performed four experimental studies with university students. As many as 671 students participated in the study. A total of 550 students participated in the first two studies (408 women and 142 men), 61 participated in the third study (28 women highly discomforted with their body and 33 moderately unsatisfied with their body) and 60 in the fourth study (30 healthy women satisfied with their body and 30 women with bulimia nervosa unsatisfied with their body).

Blanca Ortega-Roldán Oliva –one of the authors of this study– explained that the bodies that most like men and women are those of professional female models with a normal weight. “Men and women found these bodies highly pleasing and stimulating, although they made them feel a lack of control. This means that a sexy and stimulating body makes people feel a lack of control, as these bodies are considered difficult to attain or even unattainable”.

On the other hand, the study revealed that the body of a model with a normal weight negatively affects women that are highly unsatisfied with their body. Thus, unsatisfied women consider these bodies “unpleasant, very activating and unattainable (perception of lack of control)”. The reason for this perception is that these women cannot objectively evaluate a normal body in emotional terms, since they cannot avoid comparing themselves with it. This makes them feel upset, as they feel their body does not meet their beauty standards.

The Ideal Woman in Spain

In the light of the results of this study, the University of Granada researchers have demonstrated that the ideal woman in Spain does not coincide with that proposed by the media, which is currently the aesthetic and social standard. Thus, “Spanish men and women prefer the bodies of healthy models with normal weight”. This fact “should be taken into account by the advertising and fashion industry and governments, so that they help prevent the growing incidence of body dissatisfaction and the associated eating disorders”, the researchers recommend.

Finally, social pressure on women’s body might come from men, since they prefer thin women and stigmatize female obesity more than women. “Therefore, the conclusions drawn in this study should have an impact on programs aimed at preventing body dissatisfaction among women”, Ortega-Roldán concludes.

Grupo de Investigacion Fac. Psico

In the picture, the members of the University of Granada research group “Psychophysiology”.

Contacting person:
Blanca Ortega-Roldán Oliva
Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment of the University of Granada
Phone number:+34 958 24 37 53 
E-mail address: bortega@ugr.es